[LINK] grangenet

Chirgwin, Richard Richard.Chirgwin at informa.com.au
Mon May 19 14:44:42 EST 2003


Jeff,

I tried for a rant, but it's too tiring ... here's how it goes. Three months
of CommsWorld free to whoever does the best job of carving up this piece of
gee-whiz advocacy disguised as tech writing.

IMO it's just more of the "look at us! Business magazines can do technology
too!" crap that got us into the tech wreck in the first place. The sooner
Starbucks ad dollars overtake Microsoft's the better, then all the business
magazines will focus on coffee reviews and leave the technoloy to people who
care about it...

Final point: I would consider a "grid computing implementation strategy" by
any listed company to be a good reason to dump it's stock.

RC

> -----Original Message-----
> From: jeff.evans at iird.vic.gov.au [mailto:jeff.evans at iird.vic.gov.au]
> Sent: Monday, 19 May 2003 14:01
> To: Chirgwin, Richard
> Cc: link at anu.edu.au
> Subject: RE: [LINK] grangenet
> 
> 
> 
> "Chirgwin, Richard" <Richard.Chirgwin at informa.com.au> wrote:
> 
> "..because I have a strong suspicion that grid computing is a crock. "
> 
> In a recent feature in the Economist, the author of "Moving 
> up the stack"
> <http://www.economist.com/surveys/displayStory.cfm?story_id=1747317>
> would likely agree with you that the hype associated with 
> grid computing is
> just that, hype -
> 
> ""grid computing" .. is less about replacing old technology 
> and more about
> managing the existing gear ...  What is more, many of today's 
> IT systems
> are a patchwork that is inherently inefficient, so firms 
> spend 70-90% of
> their IT budgets simply on keeping their systems running. "
> 
> They talk of  "grid computing software (only half-jokingly called
> "griddleware" by some).."
> 
> however
> 
> "... once all the technical challenges of grid computing have been
> overcome, hardware will have become a true commodity. 
> Machines, storage
> devices and networks will lose their identity and feed into pools of
> resources that can be tapped as needed. This liquefaction of 
> hardware, in
> turn, will allow computing to become a utility, and software a service
> delivered online. "
> 
> This article is from an interesting series of articles, 
> Coming of age - A
> survey of the IT industry
> <http://www.economist.com/surveys/displaystory.cfm?story_id=1747329>
> 
> Regards
> 
> Jeff Evans
> Manager, Business Channel (acting)
> Business Information Services
> Department of Innovation, Industry and Regional Development
> Victoria, Australia
> Ph 03 9651 9590 Fax 03 9651 9725
> Email jeff.evans at iird.vic.gov.au
> http://www.business.channel.vic.gov.au
> http://www.businessaccess.vic.gov.au
> http://www.export.vic.gov.au
> http://www.ecommerce.vic.gov.au
> 
> 
>                                                               
>                                                               
>                
>                     "Chirgwin, Richard"                       
>                                                               
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>                     <Richard.Chirgwin at infor       To:     
> link at anu.edu.au                                               
>                    
>                     ma.com.au>                    cc:         
>                                                               
>                
>                     Sent by:                      Fax to:     
>                                                               
>                
>                     link-bounces at anu.edu.au       Subject:    
>  RE: [LINK] grangenet                                         
>                
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>                     19/05/2003 10:57 AM                       
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> 
> 
> 
> Tom,
> 
> Well: Grangenet isn't inexplicable, though. "It's a research 
> project to:
> a) find out whether it's feasible to build a really big distributed
> computer, using standard communications;
> b) figure out what's missing from the technologies;
> c) keep Australia up-to-date with technology like "Grid 
> Computing", which
> companies like IBM are promoting as hugely important.
> 
> >>Trying to imitate the language of US PR is pointless, 
> because it's not
> the
> 
> >>language that gets
> >>the results ...
> >PR what the policy makers and the general public are
> >educated with. It is therefore a language which gets results.
> 
> Missing word. "It's not >just< the language that gets 
> results". My fault
> for
> the confusion.
> 
> The results demand the back end effort - actually, more than the press
> release. A press release on its own is just one more drop in 
> a very big
> ocean.
> 
> >What annoys me is when the technical types
> >can't bothered even to do that, but expect others
> >to make an effort to understand what they are doing.
> 
> My experience and yours diverge here. In writing this stuff 
> for a decade,
> from electronics to broadcasting to science to comms to 
> software, technical
> people have mostly loved explaining stuff. In the main, 
> though, they have
> preferred spending time on explanation if I am prepared to 
> offer up a long
> interview rather than a short one.
> 
> What they profoundly dislike is being phoned up for a couple of sound
> bytes,
> with no context; unless they are accomplished media players 
> (eg Flannery)
> dealing with reasonably capable journalists.
> 
> Quick Points
> >That sounded good, but their web site
> >didn't seem to say anything about it
> ><http://www.cmis.csiro.au/esecurity>.
> 
> Well. Try www.cmis.csiro.au without the extra directory and 
> look at the
> press release, right there on the left hand side of the page. 
> But there you
> go: CSIRO sent out a press release and what happened? ...it 
> disappeared
> into
> the ether.
> 
> As to Grangenet is/isn't the next Internet: my reason for 
> saying "no" is
> still the same: it's a misapplication of the word Internet, 
> which risks
> confusing peoples' understanding of the technology.
> 
> Is Grangenet "as important as the Internet"? Maybe. I suspect 
> not, because
> I
> have a strong suspicion that grid computing is a crock. But 
> that doesn't
> matter: because the research is important even if the endpoint isn't
> reached.
> 
> Richard Chirgwin
> _______________________________________________
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> 
> 
> 
> 
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